WHERE’S WOODY

Who is the true leader of the orchestra? We all think it’s the conductor. But the instruments of the orchestra know the true fact…it’s the baton! For the first time it will be given the credit it so well deserves in this story in rhyme you are about to read. Woody, the baton, mysteriously disappears and the conductor is absolutely helpless without it. Will it be found in time for the concert, and if it is, what will be the outcome?

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Inspiration

I liked writing stories about musical instruments, and since I hadn’t done any in rhyme for a couple of years, I again decided to try my hand at it. But like everything else, if you haven’t done it for a while you get rusty, and that’s what happened to me. When I began I had trouble getting the rhyme and rhythm, and ended up with an inferior product called The Blame Game, that I finally filed into my Discarded Folder. A year later I looked at it again, and with some major changes I thought it could be salvaged by adding a new character called Woody, and it worked. The story was now stronger. To resolve the rhyme and rhythm problem, I remembered that when I wrote Baby Bears Meet the Band and Band Busters, I took two words that rhymed, then built the verse and ideas around them, and out came the following story. This is my own technique and I wouldn’t recommend it for everyone. Once I wrote the first verse the story began to roll. It’s sort of cute and nothing heavy. One word of advise–careful how you treat your baton, it may by Woody.

Comments

  1. gloria fontenot says:

    I eat with you everyday at the senior center. I never realized that you were so talented. I truely enjoyed your stories and I look forward to hearing more. This transmission was done by my close friend because i’m tecnically iliterate. See you tomorrow
    Gloria ( at the lunch table )

  2. If you see Gloria before tomorrow please thank her for me

    Felix

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